If there is an excess of protein in the child’s diet, it will lead to the risk of obesity or diabetes when the child grows up, while a lack of protein will lead to malnutrition. So how much protein do children need each day to be healthy? GREEN BHAG will help parents answer this question through the following information.

firstHow much protein should babies have?

Children aged 6-12 months need about 115-125g of meat, and children from 1-2 years old need 140-150g of meat.

On average, in 100g of food, there will be different protein content, more specifically: Beef, pork, chicken will range from 20 to 21g of protein; seafood (meat part) 16-18g; chicken or duck eggs 13-14g. Protein needs of babies account for about 10-15% of total energy. Therefore, for babies aged 6-12 months, they need about 115-125g of meat, and babies from 1-2 years old need 140-150g of meat.

However, protein content is also found in milk, legumes, vegetables, cheese and other foods. Therefore, babies from 6-12 months should eat from 60-80g/day, and babies from 1-2 years old eat from 100-120g/day.

2Is animal protein or plant protein better for children?

Plant proteins have less nutritional value than animals in that they do not have essential amino acids

Animal protein comes from livestock, poultry or seafood. They are rich in essential amino acids, with the highest biological value being the protein in milk and eggs. And vegetable protein comes from plants such as soybeans, green beans, black beans, white beans, sesame, peanuts.

Plant proteins have less nutritional value than animals in that they do not have essential amino acids, or they are arranged unbalanced. Therefore, children should eat more animal protein, and the elderly should eat more vegetable protein.

3What happens if a child eats too much protein?

A baby's lack of protein will lead to malnutrition, but eating too much is not beneficial

A baby’s lack of protein will lead to malnutrition, but eating too much is not beneficial. On the contrary, it also causes indigestion, prolonged constipation and leads to loss of appetite. In the process of digestion, protein also produces many toxins that make the liver and kidneys work too hard, which makes the baby’s body tired.

In addition, parents need to balance the ratio between protein, sugar, fat and vitamins in an important meal for the best absorption of protein. Parents should not focus too much on protein and ignore other nutritional groups.

See more: Good fish for babies to eat weaning

The recent information has helped parents better understand the protein content of plants and animals, thereby supplementing their children fully, avoiding excess or lack of protein. Wishing mothers and babies always happy and healthy!

GREEN Department Store